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HSIP Systemic Safety Funding Application Process
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Systematic Safety Application Cycle

Overview 

In January 2022, ODOT’s Highway Safety Program will begin to accept project applications that focus on preventing injuries resulting from pedestrian and roadway departure crashes through systemic infrastructure improvements. Systemic improvements are meant to be proactive and widely implemented based on roadway features that have been associated with specific crash types. FHWA has identified a range of proven countermeasures that prevent pedestrian and roadway departure crashes, and ODOT wants to encourage project applications that focus on the implementation of these improvements. Applications will be due January 31, 2022 and project sponsors will be notified of award in March 2022. 

Funding 

Project sponsors can request up to $2 million for pedestrian and $5 million for roadway departure safety improvements for all project phases. A 10% local match will be required. This match may be reduced/removed if the project sponsor meets certain financial distress criteria. Maintenance-related projects will not be accepted through this program.  

Location Eligibility

  Pedestrian

  • Must be on a principal arterial, minor arterial, or major collector (Functional Classifications 3, 4, 5)
  • Combined AT Demand and AT Need Score is 5 or greater
  • Posted speed limit 45 mph or below

Pedestrian roadway

  Roadway Departure

  • Must be on a principal arterial, minor arterial, or major collector (Functional Classifications 3, 4, 5)
  • Urban/Suburban context with posted speed limit of 35 mph +
  • Rural context with posted speed limit of 45 mph +

Roadway Departure Sample road

Promoted Countermeasures 

  Pedestrian

  • Pavement Markings
    • High-visibility crosswalks
    • Advance yield markings
  • Signage
    • Standard crosswalk signs (postmounted or overhead)
    • RRFBs
    • Overhead signs
  • Geometric Changes
    • Curb ramps
    • Raised crosswalks
    • Curb extensions
    • Reduced curb radii
    • Refuge islands
    • Sidewalk
    • Road Diets
  • Signals
    • Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons
    • Accessible pedestrian signals
    • Pedestrian countdown signals
    • Leading pedestrian intervals
  • Lighting

  Roadway Departure

  • Increasing pavement width to accommodate centerline and/or edge line rumble strips or stripes
  • Wider shoulders for bicycles and/or buggies
  • Improving roadside safety
  • Rural context
    • Flattening end condition slopes
    • Modifying ditches
    • Removing Type-A guardrail
    • Removing/relocating fixed objects (trees, utility poles, etc.)
  • Urban/suburban context
    • Removing Type-A guardrail
    • Removing/relocating fixed objects (trees, utility poles, etc.)
    • Road Diets

Application Requirements 

For pedestrian project applications, project sponsors will provide prioritized locations that include countermeasures tied to each individual location, estimated cost by phase and funding source, as well as a list of Key Safety Metrics for each location. 

For roadway departure project applications, project sponsors will provide a summary of the proposed changes by location/segment, any visual concepts developed, estimated cost by phase and funding source, as well as a list of Key Safety Metrics for each location. 

More information on this program and other programs offered by ODOT’s Highway Safety Improvement Program can be found here

Project Prioritization and Committee Review 

Unlike the formal application process, systemic project applications will not be scored. Applications will be reviewed by a committee to ensure the project meets criteria, has accurate cost estimates and appropriate countermeasures.  The amount awarded each round will be capped. If the total cost of projects that the committee approves goes beyond this amount, projects will be prioritized by cost efficiencies (getting more done for less) and equity measures, which include the project sponsor’s funding history with the Highway Safety Program and financial distress metrics.